Tag Archives: downtown

Who, where Rob Ford got votes

Poll results show what areas of the city voted in Ford for mayor
Was it downtown, suburbs that gave him most support?
Kris Scheuer

Rob Ford greets young boy

Rob Ford is mayor-elect in Toronto having gotten 383,501 votes to win.
In second place was George Smitherman with 289,832 votes. Ford beat Smitherman with 93,669 more votes.
The mayor is elected city-wide, but what areas of T.O were Ford’s biggest supporters from? Curious? I was.
Today, the city election office released poll-by-poll results for all mayoral candidates. This let us know which of the 44 wards Rob Ford got his support from and where second-place finisher George Smitherman won his votes. Let’s take a look (and check this out to see where past mayor’s got their support).
On average here is the breakdown:
In Scarborough’s 10 wards Ford overwhelmingly beat Smitherman.
In Etobicoke’s 6 wards picked Ford by a huge margin.
More voters in York’s 6 wards loved Ford too than Smitherman.
North York and Don Valley wards also loved Ford.
Parkdale-High Park and the downtown core loved Smitherman.
Midtown was split with half of it voting more for Ford and the eastern part voting more for Smitherman.
Davenport (west end of downtown) half of it voted Ford and the other half supported Smitherman.
Four wards in Beaches, East York, Riverdale, east end: three wards sided with Smitherman and one ward wit Ford. Continue reading

Kyle Rae quits city politics

The veteran will not seek re-election in 2010
His take on the voters, his colleagues and the city
By Kris Scheuer
(Written Dec. 21 for Town Crier.)

Toronto Centre-Rosedale Councillor Kyle Rae will miss consulting with constituents, but not the narrow mindedness of some colleagues at city hall.
The veteran politician will finish his 19th year on council next year and then call it quits, he announced in mid-December.
“I love the public meetings,” he tells the Town Crier Dec. 14.
Yet he’s often referred to the outrageous demands or unrealistic expectations of some voters who want to halt change.
“That’s the most hilarious part. That’s the fun part,” says Rae, who turns 55 in January. “A lot of my constituents want the status quo also, but that’s an unacceptable perspective to take in the downtown core.” Continue reading