Tag Archives: David Miller

Mayor David Miller’s legacy

Miller on his successes and hope for city’s future
An except from an exit interview with mayor
Kris Scheuer
(Written Nov. 24 for Town Crier)

Mayor David Miller gets ready to wave goodbye to politics. His second term ends Nov. 30, 2010. Photo by Francis Crescia/Town Crier.

In November 2002, before he was elected as mayor, David Miller told me as a Town Crier reporter he’d know if he was successful as a leader if “everyone feels that city hall is honest, trustworthy and if in every neighbourhood people can point to positive change.”
Based on that, he said he’s succeeded.
“My first campaign was … about taking a city government that had unfortunately slid into being a government that if you knew where the backrooms were you could get your business done,” he said today in an interview. “It (city hall) wasn’t there for the people of Toronto.”
Miller was one of the few councillors who pushed for an inquiry into the MFP computer leasing scandal that included allegations of bribery against a former politician.
In her final report Justice Denise Bellamy recommended a series of accountability offices such as an integrity officer, lobbyist registry and city ombudsman that Miller later created.
He also argues that compared to the past his administration has been virtually scandal-free.
“The city government has come under some criticism for relatively minor things like a councillor renting a squirrel costume, which I suggest rather pales in comparison to the MFP scandal where hundreds of millions went out the back door (in contracts) because people were connected to people in power and paid them off,” said Miller

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David Miller before he was mayor

One of my first interviews with Miller back in 2002
A year before he became mayor, here’s his vision for Toronto
Kris Scheuer
(Written for Town Crier Nov. 7/02. UPDATE.)

David Miller in his councillor days before becoming mayor in Nov. 2003.

“I think the city faces a great future, but only if we have great leadership and I don’t think we do now,” Parkdale Councillor David Miller told a small crowd, who had gathered to hear him speak at a Rosedale gallery.
Miller, who wants to be the city’s next mayor, spoke and answered questions on Nov. 6 2002 at D&E Lake Limited on Yonge St. north of Summerhill subway station.
“I have no idea who else is running. I’m the only one who has announced candidacy publicly. I think Mel Lastman wants to run again. It’s possible he will run again. If he doesn’t, there could be four or five candidates come forth,” he told the Town Crier.
“I do know that City Hall has a lot of problems now,” he said referring, in part, to the MFP computer leasing scandal, which is being investigated by police and through a public inquiry.
“I’m worried about where the city is going,” Miller said in an interview. “I am running because Toronto needs to move forward. It’s been stagnant for the last 15-20 years. I think City Hall needs to be more open and honest and citizen-centred.”
He mentioned the need to enhance public space along with development.
“In my ward, Windemere by the Lake is building a day care in it for the public, not just residents of the building.”
“I think this election is a crux of whether the city stays vibrant or doesn’t,” Councillor David Miller.

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Rob Ford good for Midtown?

Mayor-elect’s biggest support in suburbs
Downtown not a fan, Midtown voters were  luke warm
Will  a Ford administration be good for Midtown Toronto?
Kris Scheuer
(Written for Town Crier Nov. 4)

Mayor-elect Rob Ford. Photo by Francis Crescia/Town Crier.

New mayor Rob Ford got mixed reaction from voters in midtown, but one’s thing for certain: This is definitely not his core electorate.
So his sweeping victory — he won easily with 383,501 votes — has midtown wondering: what will he do for us?
Overall, there’s a cloak of secrecy surrounding Ford these days as he bunkers down with his transition team lead by Councillor Case Ootes.
What campaign policies will Ford stand by and which will he soften?
Calls to Ford’s team were directed to Ootes, who said he could not discuss any policy direction now. Period.
“The objective of the mayor is to deliver on his commitments and to get costs under control,” Ootes said earlier this month. “I won’t get into what’s doable and what’s not doable. That’s what the transition team is discussing now.”
And while they’re behind closed doors talking, so is midtown.
There’s mixed feeling among business owners, residents and Ford’s midtown council counterparts: fear, hope or downright uncertainty of what a Rob Ford Toronto will mean for midtown.

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Joe Pantalone’s mayoral campaign

Veteran councillor says he’s lone leading progressive candidate
Pantalone would continue Miller legacy but with less taxes
Kris Scheuer
(Written fo
r Town Crier Sept.1)

DSC_6376.jpg

Mayoral hopeful Joe Pantalone during a Sept. 1 Town Crier editorial board meeting. Photo by Francis Crescia/Town Crier.

Joe Pantalone says he’s running against four right wing candidates in the mayoral contest, which will bode well for him on Oct. 25.
Pantalone told a Town Crier editorial board he offers a clear choice for voters whereas Rob Ford, George Smitherman, Sarah Thomson and Rocco Rossi offer varying degrees of the same.
“I’m the only progressive candidate for mayor,” Pantalone said.
“I’m running against a bunch of mini-Mike Harrises. All of them want to sell something. All of them want to contract out something. All of them want to shrink the city in terms of what we spend while the population is growing.”
Pantalone railed on several of his opponents’ ideas, including Smitherman’s idea to privatize some TTC bus routes, Rossi’s pledge to sell Toronto Hydro and what he says is Ford’s unrealistic notion of spending. Continue reading

Shelley Carroll may run for mayor

Bid for city’s top job isn’t certain
But councillor Carroll says she’ll be on the ballot in 2010
By Kris Scheuer and Karolyn Coorsh
(Written  Oct. 6 for Town Crier. Update here.)

Whether it be for mayor or councillor, Shelley Carroll will be on the ballot for 2010.

One thing is for certain: North York councillor Shelley Carroll is running in next year’s municipal election.
The Don Valley East rep is contemplating whether to seek re-election in Ward 33 or jump into the race for mayor.
The budget chief said she’ll make a decision before the end of the year.
“I am running for council if nothing else,” Carroll said from her city hall office. “I do have to think about the mayor’s office.” Continue reading

David Miller’s vision for Toronto

Before David Miller became mayor, he spelled out his view for the city
My interview with him in 2002 before he became mayor
A look back now that Miller’s announced he won’t run again
By Kris Scheuer
(Originally written for Town Crier Nov. 7/2002)

“I think the city faces a great future, but only if we have great leadership and I don’t think we do now,” Parkdale High-Park councillor David Miller told a small crowd, who had gathered to hear him speak at a Rosedale gallery. 
Miller, who wants to be the city’s next mayor, spoke and answered questions on Nov. 6 at D&E Lake Limited on Yonge St. north of Summerhill subway station.
“I have no idea who else is running. I’m the only one who has announced candidacy publicly. I think Mel Lastman wants to run again. It’s possible he will run again. If he doesn’t, there could be four or five candidates come forth,” he said.
“I do know that City Hall has a lot of problems now,” he said referring, in part, to the MFP computer leasing scandal, which is being investigated by police and through a public inquiry. 
“I’m worried about where the city is going,” Miller said in an interview. Continue reading

Mayor Miller’s family ties

David Miller cited his family as reason he’s not running again
I have seen his focus on son, daughter, wife even when media cameras aren’t on
By Kris Scheuer

I was at the press conference yesterday when Mayor Miller announced he would not seek a third term in the 2010 city election.
I have covered city hall since 2001 at time he was a Parkdale-High Park councillor. And one of my vivid memories is as a Town Crier reporter covering his election win in 2003 as mayor. The atmosphere was like a rock concert, but the lead of my story at the time was that on the biggest night of his political life he remembered and was focused on his family: wife Jill Arthur and especially son Simon and daughter Julia.
To read that 2003 election win article, click here to read what I mean.
There’s also a terrific article in The Globe & Mail today by veteran reporter Jennifer Lewington where she has an exclusive sit down with the mayor hours after his announcement.