Tag Archives: Councillor Doug Holyday

Toronto councillors 2010 election

The election campaign already heating up
Who is retiring, running, playing coy in TO election
By Kris Scheuer
(Updated Oct.25- Election Day.)

 

Councillor Joe Mihevc

Joe Mihevc is one of the incumbent councillors seeking re-election.

 

One thing is certain in life – that’s change. And we can count on that in this city’s election. The vote is Oct. 25.
Of the 44 incumbent city councillors so far 35 current Toronto politicians have signed up for re-election in their own ward. Of the remaining 9 incumbents: 2 are running for mayor instead and 7 aren’t running at all. Want to see for yourself?
Check the city’s election website that shows all 477 candidates running for mayor, councillor and school trustee positions.
Here’s the scope on where all the candidates stand as of Sept. 10 the final nomination day.
Mayor David Miller is not running for re-election. There are 40 candidates registered to run for mayor.
Council races – there are 279 candidates running for 44 council seats
Ron Moeser (Scarborough East Ward 44) has registered and so have three others: Diana Hall, Heath Thomas and Mohammed Mirza.
Paul Ainslie (Scarborough East Ward 43) is running again and has four challengers: John Laforet, Benjamin Mbaegbu, Bhaskar Sharma and Samuel Getachew.

Continue reading

Toronto’s next mayor will be…

Here’s a prelim list of people who are rumoured for the job
Mayor David Miller won’t run in 2010, so who will?
By Kris Scheuer
(See Dec. 16 update)

Everyone wants to be Toronto’s next mayor. A week ago day, Mayor David Miller announced he will not run again in next year’s election.
Since then it seems half of council and a handful of outside candidates have mused about running.
As a city hall reporter, here the unofficial list (no one can register until Jan.4) of who I have heard may run or people who have already indicated their interest:
Current councillors Shelley Carroll, Denzil Minnan-Wong, Adam Vaughan, Rob Ford, Doug Holyday, Giorgio Mammoliti, Karen Stintz, Adam Giambrone.
Other candidates not at city hall now include former Winnipeg mayor Glen Murray, Toronto-Centre MPP George Smitherman, former Ontario PC leader John Tory, Trinity-Spadina MP Olivia Chow, former city councillor Jane Pitfield. Continue reading

Who will be next Toronto mayor?

Mayor David Miller won’t run in next election, he announced today
Here’s a list of early possible contenders for 2010 mayoralty race
By Kris Scheuer
(Join the debate below, see update here.)

I attended David Miller’s press conference at 10 am today when he declared he won’t seek a third term as Toronto’s mayor.
For that story, click here.
In the hours that followed myself and colleague Karolyn Coorsh heard about a number of possible candidates for mayor. Keep in mind that we spoke to just a handful of politicians and strategists, so this is just an initial list of contenders. And the next city election is 14 months away.
Tell me if you would vote for any of them or would like to see someone else run instead.
Possible Toronto mayoralty candidates for 201o that were mentioned to me and fellow Town Crier reporter Karolyn today. Keep in mind these names were told to us as possibilities only. No one has officially thrown their hat in the ring, yet. Continue reading

Miller strikes back at critics

An exclusive op-ed for the Town Crier by Mayor David Miller
This opinion piece by T.O’s mayor offers his thoughts on the strike

By Mayor David Miller
(Written by Mayor Miller Aug. 11 for the Town Crier. This is the paper Kris Scheuer works as city hall reporter.)

The strike by CUPE local 79 and TCEU local 416 was an extremely difficult time for the people of Toronto, city employees and city council.
However, Torontonians coped remarkably well. City management and non-union staff deserve immense credit for the work they did to keep the city moving while 30,000 people were off the job.
One question I was repeatedly asked during the labour disruption was why it had to happen at all. Now that we’ve reached a negotiated settlement with our employees, I believe it’s a good time to answer that question.
The unions went on strike because they wanted parity with provincewide contracts like the one awarded to the Toronto Police Service by an arbitrator. Such settlements, reached between 2006 and 2008, followed a provincial pattern of wage increases of at least 3 percent per year. With benefit improvements, those contracts saw employment costs for Ontario cities climb in the range of 11 and 12 percent over a three-year period. Continue reading

Who voted for new union contracts

Toronto city council approved new deals two unions
Here’s how each politician voted
By Kris Scheuer

The strike is over after city council approved new contracts for CUPE locals 416 and 79.
The final vote was a close one at 21-17 in a heated debate on July 31.
Want to know how every politician voted? Continue reading

City and unions strike a deal

Tentative agreement between city and striking CUPE members
Unions to take new contract to vote as soon as July 29

Photo by Francis Crescia/Town Crier.
By Kris Scheuer
(Originally written July 27 for Town Crier.)
The city reached a settlement today to end the 36-day strike, Mayor David Miller announced this afternoon. 
“Without question this has been a difficult period for everyone,” Miller said at a 3:30 p.m. press conference.
“It’s good news for the 30,000 women and men who can now get back to doing the jobs they do so well. It’s especially good news for the residents and businesses that count on city services especially the families and children who have been struggling without access to city run daycares, camps and pools.” 
Miller thanked Torontonians for their patience and co-operation “under very difficult circumstances.” Continue reading