Daily Archives: April 9, 2010

One Bloor new development

Condo tower breathes new life into intersection
Great Gulf’s 65-storey building at Yonge and Bloor
By Kris Scheuer
(Written April 1 for Town Crier)

New condo tower to be built at One Bloor East. Courtesy of Great Gulf Group.

One Bloor will rise again.
Great Gulf Group of Companies is building a 65-storey condo and retail project on the southeast corner of Yonge and Bloor streets on the same spot of the now defunct, much-hyped 80-storey tower by Bazis International.
All previous condo buyers got their money back from Bazis and will receive first dibs on the new condo project.
Corrado Di Rosa who bought into the previous project was happy to re-invest in Great Gulf’s condo tower.
“I’m on the 34th floor,” Di Rosa said March 31 a few days after purchasing.
He is confident this project will move forward.
“Because it was Great Gulf and I’m in the industry, I wasn’t hesitant (to buy) at all. I know their reputation,” said Di Rosa. Continue reading

Election races with no incumbent

Toronto election to produce shake-up
Some wards feature no incumbent as councillors retire
(Column written March 31 for Town Crier.)

We are guaranteed new political faces at city hall.
Here’s a sampling of the changes, why it will make these election races exciting and should increase voter turn out but may make it hard for constituents to choose new reps.
In midtown, councillors Kyle Rae and Michael Walker are retiring and in the east end Case Ootes is doing the same. Councillors Joe Pantalone, Rob Ford and Giorgio Mammoliti are running for mayor rather than re-election in their wards. As of April 1, a total of 36 candidates are registered in these six races with no incumbent councillors.
But the absence of incumbents, doesn’t mean newcomers will have an easier time getting elected. In fact, they may have to fight just as hard.
Toronto Centre Rosedale Councillor Rae’s Ward 27 is a prime example. His name won’t be on the ballot, but 12 candidates have registered here so far to try and replace him.
Name recognition can still be a factor in races with no incumbent, says University of Toronto political science professor Larry LeDuc. Continue reading